Does The Internet Need A United Nations When It Doesn't Have A First Amendment?

By Patrick Non-White


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The Department of Commerce has announced that it will soon abdicate its responsibility for maintaining the internet’s Domain Name System, the directory that allows translation of a plain English (or Russian, or Turkish) term like popehat.com into the string of numbers and periods that are this site’s actual address. DNS is the internet’s central nervous system, to analogize crudely. If a site is removed from DNS, it may as well no longer exist.

The goal, we’re told, is to spread governance of the internet from a United States agency to set of “stakeholders” from across the “global internet community.” And that’s what should worry everyone in the “global internet community” who is concerned with free speech. Unlike the Department of Commerce, the “global internet community” and its “stakeholders” are not constrained from abridging the freedom of speech.

Readers may recall the case of American talk radio host Glenn Beck, who in 2009 sued the owner of the parodic website GlennBeckRapedAndMurderedAYoungGirlIn1990.com, in the World Internet Property Organization (a United Nations body), arguing that the site’s name was defamatory, and that it infringed Beck’s trademark in the name “Glenn Beck.” (The parody countered Beck’s style of argument in which he demands opponents prove a negative: “Barack Obama must prove he wasn’t in Indonesia on August 4, 1961!”) How do we know Glenn Beck didn’t rape and murder a young girl in 1990, after all? Beck hasn’t proven he didn’t. We have only his word to rely upon. The World Internet Property Organization, to its credit and thanks to the commendable advocacy of defense attorney Marc Randazza, denied Beck’s claims, finding the assertion contained in the site’s name to be an obvious parody that only a dipshit would credit as true.

What’s telling about the Beck case is that Beck, for all his professed faith in the United States Constitution, chose not to file his claim in an American court. Beck certainly could have done so: the defendant, like Beck, was an American citizen and subject to the jurisdiction of United States courts. But the First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides broad protections to free speech, some of the broadest in the world, constraining courts and government agencies alike from infringing speech. And a website’s name, just like its text, is speech.

No, Beck, or his attorneys, assumed he’d get better treatment from a United Nations agency in his efforts to quash free speech than …read more

Source: Donkeyrock_BlurBlog

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