School Lunches, Let’s Move! and The Vision of The Anointed

By Tom Naughton


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Someone mentioned in comments that he read The Vision of the Anointed after I talked about it in my most recent speech and it “blew my mind” … but it’s also depressing to see The Anointed following the same pattern over and over.

Yeah, I suppose. It’s like watching the same bad plot play out in dozens of movies. But I still think it’s better to recognize the pattern.

In case you didn’t see that speech, here’s a quick recap of how Thomas Sowell describes The Vision of The Anointed at work:

  • The Anointed identify a problem in society
  • The Anointed propose a Grand Plan to fix the problem
  • Because they are so supremely confident in their ideas, The Anointed don’t bother with proof or evidence that the Grand Plan will actually work
  • If possible, The Anointed will impose the Grand Plan on other people (for their own good, of course)
  • The Anointed assume anyone who opposes the Grand Plan is either evil or stupid
  • If the Grand Plan fails, The Anointed will never, ever, ever admit the Grand Plan was wrong

I wrote six posts recently explaining why I believe losing weight (or not getting fat in the first place) is mostly about chemistry, not character. That’s why the current Grand Plans designed by The Anointed to battle obesity are going to fail: they’re based on the belief that losing weight is a matter of character. Stop being a lazy glutton, get off the couch, go move around more, stop eating so much, and all will be well. (And don’t forget your whole grains.)

One of those Grand Plans is, of course, the Let’s Move! campaign. Just tell those kids to move more. Get some pro jocks to encourage them to move more. After all, we The Anointed know kids are getting fat from sitting around too much.

Except that’s not what the evidence shows. Kids don’t get fat after they start sitting around. They sit around after they start getting fat. Here’s what one study concluded:

Decreased physical activity may have little to do with the recent spike in obesity rates among U.S. adolescents, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prompted by growing concern that the increase was due to decreased physical activity associated with increased TV viewing time and other sedentary behaviors, researchers examined the patterns and time trends in physical activity and …read more

Source: Donkeyrock_BlurBlog

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