Your Criticism of My Holocaust Analogy Is Like Yet ANOTHER Holocaust

By Ken White


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from Popehat:
Conflating speech and violence encourages citizens to think that speech should be controlled like violence. That’s not a abstract danger. It’s real. States continue to pass idiotic “cyber-bulling” statutes, blundering around the legal landscape trying to determine which insults are hurtful enough to criminalize.

When Tom Perkins wrote his letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal suggesting that very rich people are facing a “progressive Kristallnacht,” the marketplace of ideas functioned as advertised. Tom Perkins said something very stupid, and was widely ridiculed as someone who had said something very stupid. He was the butt of many jokes and his former associates distanced themselves from him.

Perkins’ comment was self-serious and inflammatory enough to be slightly novel. The reaction was mundane. So was the utterly predictable reaction to the reaction. This time, that sur-reaction is delivered by the Wall Street Journal, in an editorial helpfully titled “Perkinsnacht: Liberal Vituperation Makes Our Letter Writer’s Point.”

Maybe the critics are afraid that Mr. Perkins is onto something about the left’s political method. Consider the recent record of liberals in power.

The Journal goes on to decry genuine abuses of power — like the IRS’s despicable targeting of ideologically incorrect groups — and rhetorical douchebaggery from the likes of Andrew Cuomo and Bill DeBlasio. The Journal sullenly concludes:

The liberals aren’t encouraging violence, but they are promoting personal vilification and the abuse of government power to punish political opponents.

But personal vilification isn’t violence, and it is right and fit to call people out every time they say it is, and then call them out again when they double down.

Vigorous and hurtful and unpleasant speech is what we have instead of violence. Our ability to level such viscerally satisfying attacks on speech we don’t like is a crucial part of what convinces us, as a nation, not to censor speech we don’t like. In Europe, Tom Perkins might face official sanctions for saying the wrong thing about the Holocaust; here, he faces late-night jokes and insulting cartoons and the contempt of many. I like our way better.

It’s common, now, to indulge in rhetoric that conflates criticism with violence or official oppression. People — mostly African-Americans — were actually lynched by …read more

Source: Donkeyrock_BlurBlog

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